Highly professional investment fraud

“made in” Taiwan, Hong Kong and the People’s Republic of China

The fraudsters call themselves: Jeremy Blythe, Jonathan Chapman, David Harper, Thomas Kemp, Tony Lawson, Jonathan Lyons, Charles Murphy, Andrew Powell, Dieter Schnyder, William Wentworth, Stefan Wernstein. Voice recordings of the fraudsters will soon be put online.

Brooks Dawson Alliance, Ward Henderson Management, Gentry Wilson Partners, Radford Taylor, Lewis Bentley Group and numerous other “investment advisors” are representatives of an internationally active gang that cheats Germans, Austrians and Swiss people out of their money on an industrial scale. The amount of damage is in the order of up to 100 million euros or more. Hong Kong’s financial center is the actual scene of the crime. The fraudsters have been able to open numerous accounts at the renowned major banks HSBC Hong Kong and Bank of China Hong Kong, and accomplices are suspected to be working in these banks. Support for clarification and claims settlement by the involved banks, financial regulators and public prosecutor’s offices of the affected countries is currently still hesitant.

Central Europe (Austria, Germany and Switzerland) is currently being flooded by a professional investment fraud. In the last 18 months or even longer, Taiwan, Hong Kong and the PRC have become the starting point of a worldwide and industrialized financial fraud on a large scale; officially, more than 10 or even up to a hundred “brokerage firms” are located in Taipei. However, according to available information, the fraud is carried out in Hong Kong, a renowned financial center, which is actually known for its highly developed financial industry. In addition, the fraud is supported by helpers from mainland China.

Renowned financial institutions are hosting the fraudsters’ bank accounts. The most prestigious ones: HSBC Hong Kong and Bank of China Hong Kong. There are even indications that employees of these two major banks are acting as accomplices.

The fraud follows a well-known pattern and focuses on CEOs and managers of SME companies, from whom the fraudsters can expect rapid decision-making but also factually critical questions. According to current knowledge, the fraudsters come from the financial industry, have in-depth knowledge of the financial markets and argue eloquently with a British accent. Allegedly the fraudsters are ex-Lehmann – brokers.

These fraudsters are among others supported by call centres in Kuala Lumpur and Manila. The task of these call centers is to make cold calls. As soon as a customer shows interest, a junior “broker” takes over, who after an initial investment of the recruited customer hands over to the senior “broker”. This senior broker then executes the actual fraud.

It is estimated that these calls have caused 100 – 400 victims in Central Europe with financial losses of up to 100 million Euros.

You can find more information on the subject of investment fraud by clicking on the links below. In addition, many law firms offer information on the fraudulent companies we have also identified. Since the chances of success of the legal approach – especially from the German-speaking area – are to be assessed as rather low, we would like to avoid unintentional advertising for third parties here.

An article from Northern Germany describing the case of an unscrupulously cheated pensioner:

https://www.kreiszeitung-wochenblatt.de/harsefeld/c-wirtschaft/wertlose-wertpapiere_a156710

The Adiceltic portal maintains a page with plenty of information on this form of investment fraud:

https://adiceltic.de/investmentbetrug

On Facebook there is the group “Financial Fraud Victims International”, for whose participation one must first register:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/102239743981274/

On the private website “Sumselkawumsel” a lot of information about fraudulent companies and their methods has been collected:

and

The English language site “Investment scammers” names numerous other fraudulent companies:

https://www.investmenthoax.com/voice-samples-of-scammers